What it Means to Have a Growth Mindset

Posted by Jennifer Peterson on Oct 17, 2019 2:33:06 PM

If you’re an educator or have been near an educational institution over the last few years, you’ve most likely heard the phrase ‘Growth Mindset.’ It seems to be the new buzz word as of late. But what exactly does it mean? And why is it so important? And if you don’t have one, how do you get one?

Read More

Topics: elementary, high school, learners, middle school, success skills, growth mindset

How Harkness Discussions Enhance Student Learning

Posted by Stephanie Almozara on Oct 9, 2019 11:00:00 AM

When I taught middle school, one of my colleagues periodically mentioned facilitating Harkness discussions in her senior class. I never thought to inquire more (my middle schoolers kept me busy!), but I was intrigued by the details she provided when she talked about it. After I returned to teaching high school seniors, I saw that the New Jersey Association of Independent Schools was offering a workshop on how to facilitate Harkness discussions and decided it was time to learn about this method of teaching. I signed up and, on a cold winter day, went to The Lawrenceville School to learn about the Harkness method.

Read More

Topics: teaching, education, students, harkness

Kindergarten Readiness: Getting School Ready

Posted by Megan O'Connor on Sep 30, 2019 11:00:00 AM

Warm summer days and September have quickly come and gone, leaving us with crisp fall weather and back-to-school activities. Now that you and your family have settled into the back-to-school and extracurricular routine, it’s time to begin thinking about getting ready for kindergarten and next steps!

Read More

5 Ways Student-Athletes Can Boost Self Confidence

Posted by Melissa Maskery on Sep 23, 2019 11:00:00 AM

Student-athletes may feel a sense of insecurity or self-doubt when they step on the field or the court. It may be jitters associated with playing in a big game, playing a new position or simply returning to the field after the off-season. They may feel pressure from parents or coaches to "be the best" or play perfectly, but that pressure often takes over and leaves the player ineffective and overwhelmed with low self-esteem. Instead of sweeping that anxiety under the rug, it's important to tackle it head-on. Read below for five strategies for student-athletes so they can boost self-confidence.

Read More

Top Things to Do in Summit, NJ This Fall

Posted by Meghan Hodgin on Sep 16, 2019 11:00:00 AM

There are so many wonderful activities happening this fall right in our backyard! See below for our list of some of the top things to do in Summit, NJ this fall, and make sure to bookmark this page as we add events throughout the season.

Read More

Topics: summit new jersey, Summit NJ, things to do

Re-Entering School’s Atmosphere: Lessons Learned from Apollo 11

Posted by Michele Proia on Sep 4, 2019 11:00:00 AM

One of the most exhilarating and unifying moments of the 20th century was the Apollo 11 mission to the moon. During several hot July days in 1969, people all over the world were glued to a television or radio anxiously following the astronauts’ progress to outer space and awaiting Commander Neil Armstrong’s first words as he stepped onto the moon. Willing to put aside global tensions for a bit, we became citizens of the world as we watched Armstrong and fellow astronaut Buzz Aldrin, gleeful and childlike, bouncing and driving along the dusty and hilly and mysterious lunar surface.

Read More

Topics: back-to-school, wellness, building confidence, first day of school

5 Ways to Start the School Year Off Right

Posted by Meghan Hodgin on Aug 20, 2019 11:00:00 AM

Parents get ready; it’s almost time for your child to go back-to-school! For many, this can be a stressful time. Transitions at any age are an adjustment and the earlier you can start preparing your child for the change in routine, environment, workload, friends, etc., the less stress there is for everyone.

Read More

Topics: elementary school, parenting, separation anxiety, kindergarten ready

How to Help a Grieving Child

Posted by Adriana B. Dunn, Ph.D. & Laura K. Palmer, Ph.D. on May 6, 2019 11:00:00 AM

As parents and educators, our focus is to protect children, to shield them from distress and to create environments that foster their growth and development. While we usually manage to navigate the day-to-day situations and stressors that children face without too much difficulty, we are often at loss when faced with having to talk to children about death. How much do we tell them? Will they be able to understand? Will they get too upset? What if they show no emotion? When do we seek outside support?

Read More

Topics: parenting, student advice, wellness, social and emotional learning, building confidence, mental health

Pardon my French: Why the Language of Love Is Still Relevant

Posted by Michele Proia on Apr 29, 2019 11:00:00 AM

Very rarely do we question the practical, lifelong applications of a high school class. When was the last time you wondered, for instance, whether Ohm’s Law would be useful in your career? Or, does knowing that James Buchanan was our 15th President have an impact on your earning capacity? And, what about those sines and cosines — what practical meaning could they possibly offer to your life? With foreign language, however, the “useful” question invariably comes up and many times families choose a course of language study based upon its pragmatic value. So, let’s explore the practical side of learning language in general and learning French in particular.

Read More

How to Talk to Your Child about Mental Health

Posted by Dr. Jennifer Butler-Sweeney, Ph.D. on Apr 22, 2019 11:00:00 AM

As parents and educators, we seek to put our teen’s behaviors, emotions and difficulties into mutually exclusive categories that we can readily understand and, by extension, start the processing of fixing. This assuages our own anxieties about being ineffective in our children’s lives and, replaces that inner parental angst with controllable variables in the form of actionable items and measurable gains. If your teen comes home expressing that nothing in math class is making sense, parents may act in the straightforward response of contacting the teacher or enlisting the help of a tutor, should one not already exist. This is an “easy one” as parenting goes, in that the direction is clear and there is a reasonable expectation that this intervention will fix or at least mitigate the problem.

Read More

Topics: high school, elementary school, parenting, middle school, wellness, building confidence, mental health